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      How to Make Kimchi

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      Time8 Hr
      DifficultyEasy
      Serves4

      Kimchi can be defined as the essence of a Korean kitchen. Korean cuisine is an example of a fluid and dynamic cuisine. Constantly taking inspiration from its ancient cookbooks and relying on technologies, Korean cuisine has made a name for itself. With a perfect balance in nutrition and flavour, this cuisine has a huge fan base around the world. When we talk about the age-old recipe of kimchi, the ... Korean ancestral heritage is awoken. This age-old ingredient in Korean cuisine has come a long way from its origin. It is a beloved ingredient that gives you a taste of just the right amount of spices and condiments. A mainstay on the Korean dinner table, kimchi has made its way into the hearts of Korean cuisine lovers around the world. Kimchi has several exquisite flavours that float around your mouth on the first bite. The epitome of the yin and yang philosophy, each of these flavours strike a balance to give you the perfect taste. This fermented food has five essential flavours (sour, bitter, salty, sweet, and spicy). This culinary masterpiece is infused in garlic, chillies, and ginger. Kimchi recipes are a hit or a miss owing to the balance of these flavours. The right texture and taste make kimchi the best appetizer in terms of nutrition as well as taste. There are cabbages as well as carrot recipes for kimchi, each with their ground-breaking tastes. Served as a main dish as well as a side to flavoured rice, noodles, and soup, kimchi has been in the good books of flavour for a very long time.

      Nutrition Info. (per serving)

      ProteinFatCarbsFibre53 Cal53 Cal53 Cal53 Cal
      • 2gProtein
      • 3gFat
      • 6gCarbs
      • 3gFibre

      Ingredients

      Dry Grocery

      Salt

      Salt

      1 teaspoon

      Synthetic/white Vinegar

      Synthetic/white Vinegar

      2 teaspoons

      Jaggery

      Jaggery

      2 teaspoons

      Sesame White (til)

      Sesame White (til)

      0.5 teaspoons

      Dark Soy Sauce

      Dark Soy Sauce

      1 tablespoon

      Sesame Oil

      Sesame Oil

      1 teaspoon

      Fruits & Vegetables

      Carrot-regular

      Carrot-regular

      100 g

      Spring Onion

      Spring Onion

      5 g

      Other

      Red Chillies

      Red Chillies

      8 units

      Green Cabbage

      Green Cabbage

      200 g

      Directions
      1
      Wash and peel the carrot. cut carrot slices and cabbage into dices.
      2
      Take carrot and cabbage in a bowl, sprinkle salt, jaggery and vinegar and mix it. Let it rest for 6-7 hours min.
      3
      As the veggies release water squeeze it to remove excess liquid. Set aside. preserve the liquid, would be utilized for dressing. Heat water in a pan, add whole red chillies. Let it boil. Once the liquid dries off. Take the chillies in a blender and make a smooth paste of the same. Heat oil in a pan, add the chilli paste and let it cook. Once the raw flavour goes away, set aside, let it cool.
      4
      In a bowl, combine sesame oil, chilli paste, soy sauce, toasted sesame seeds, spring onion and the solution stored after straining the cabbage - carrot mix. Mix well.
      5
      Add the cabbage and carrots and mix well until all the veggies are well coated with the dressing.
      6
      Sprinkle some sesame seeds and chopped spring onion and serve cold.

      Success!

      We hope you had fun making it! Enjoy the meal.

      Kimchi is the history of a Korean soul.

      Korea is a rage now, and it’s not about its technological progress, electronic gadgets or cars but about its K-Pop, K-drama and Kimchi. No talk about the soul of Korea is complete without Kimchi or kimchee as a dish. With annual Kimchi competitions, Kimchi songs or even stage plays enacted about Kimchi, and this iconic dish is an integral part of Korean cuisine through generations. Korean Kimchi is the culmination of the search for the perfect method to preserve and enjoy nutritious green vegetables based food throughout the year. Even when everything is covered under heavy blankets of snow during winter, this versatile “superfood” adds vigour and spice to the food on the table. Modern form of the Kimchi recipe is the product of regional variations and harmonious adaptations of spices and flavours, along with a steadfast dedication to taste and nutrition. Embodying the true spirit of Korean cooking, this traditional food is made by fermenting the freshest vegetables and storing them with salt for preservation. Inspite of its distinctly salty, sour and spicy taste emanating a pungent smell Korean Kimchi recipe has managed to cross-cultural boundaries and become a global hit. So much so that there is a Kimchi museum at COEX Mall in Gangnam, Seoul. So, what makes this staple Korean Kimchi dish so popular?

      Kimchi – It's’ the Yin and Yang of food making

      The right balance and perfect harmony are the secrets of good Kimchi. Depending on the region and season in which they are produced, there are over 300 different types of Korean Kimchi. The spring watery kimchi, called mool kimchi, is prepared with Chinese cabbage. Summer months, it’s the Chonggak kimchi, cucumber kimchi and young radish Kimchi that are popular. The harmony among the ingredients in a Kimchi recipe reflects the Five Elements theory. The balance among the five flavours of sour, bitter, salty, sweet, and spicy makes this a unique dish reminding every one of its roots. The wide variety of ingredients and many methods of preparation allows Kimchi to reach the heart of every person, enjoying this superstar of a dish.

      The Making of blockbuster Kimchi

      Fretting over how to make Kimchi at home? It is a fairly easy and simple process that can be tailored to your personal taste and spice level. Dried, salted shrimp, anchovy paste, oysters and fish sauce are mostly used for that umami taste in the most authentic kimchi recipe. The concept of making plant-based vegan Kimchi recipes is not new to Korea as the Buddhist temple food embraces the gluten-free, vegan version of this dish. Garlic and scallions are also forbidden in making this vegetarian Kimchi recipe. In place of salted and fermented seafood, temple cooks use soup soy sauce or sometimes fermented soybean paste along with dashima (dried kelp) or vegetable broth for delicious savouriness. Fruits and vegetables like pear, apple, persimmon, and pumpkin are commonly added for natural sweetness. As a substitute for the aromatic sauerkraut, a vegetarian Kimchi recipe would then consist of salted Napa cabbage and radish smeared with the miso paste and an array of seasonings for a sweet, tangy and carbonated flavour. Not only is kimchi eaten by itself as a side dish or appetizer, but it works as a condiment, an ingredient, a dip, and a side dish all on its own. Kimchi as an ingredient can give a bold upgrade to a simple bowl of Korean Noodle Soup, lends a subtle crunch to a bowl of hot and sour Tom Yum Soup and adds textural variety to a comforting bowl of Chicken Tom Yum Soup. The quality of sea salt and gochugaru (Koran hot pepper flakes) is key to making great kimchi. Replace daikon (large Asian radish) with white cabbage and add bolder flavours of fenugreek seeds, mustard and turmeric to give the traditional salad a Kimchi Indian spin. Kimchi is an all-rounder and can be used for pickling eggs too. Still worried about how to make kimchi? Pre-made kimchi is easily available in the super-markets that range from super mild to mega funky, sweeter and mellow to melt-your-face-off spicy versions that are quintessentially Korean in taste.

      It Is Alive

      Since kimchi varies widely in ingredients, its exact nutritional profile differs depending on what kimchi variety you’re making. Full of living good bacteria and gut-healing probiotics, the benefits of eating kimchi are endless. Considering its low fat and calorie content, high fibre and Vitamin value that strengthens the immune system and aids in digestion, an average Korean consumes nearly 40 pounds of kimchi per year, while many of them prefer to eat a small portion of it at least once a day or with each meal. Recognized as one of the top five healthiest foods in the world, it energizes the body, slows the ageing process, fights cancer, lowers cholesterol and regulates blood circulation. What’s more, the fermentation process may develop additional nutrients that are more easily absorbed by your body. Kimchi is absolutely safe for all to eat unless a person has any specific allergy to the individual ingredients or suffers a gas or bloating problem due to the fermentation process.

      Maximum health and Maximum Flavours

      The vegetables for Kim chi are usually sliced, highly seasoned with red pepper, onion, and garlic, and then fermented in brine in large earthenware jars. Traditionally, these jars are usually stored under the soil, totally or partially in cellars or underground sheds built expressly for the purpose of fermentation which can take approximately one month depending on weather conditions. This active fermentation process removes harmful bacteria and allows good lactobacilli to grow, assisted by the various microorganisms present in the raw inputs of the Kimchi ingredients. Unlike many other salted vegetables found across the globe, the fizzy taste of Kimchi makes it unique as an accompaniment for any Asian meal. However, Kimchi is just not about fermented vegetables. It's spicy, sour and umami flavours can electrify the most mundane of dishes, from fried rice to tacos. The use of add- on sauces consisting of chilli powder, garlic, spring onions, ginger, fermented fish, and other ingredients can vary the taste of Kimchi to meet individual palates. No wonder then that the popularity of the Kimchi recipe is as much because of the stellar range of taste bud tickling flavours as because of the nutrition benefits.

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