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      Mix Veg Upma

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      Time30 Min
      DifficultyEasy
      Serves1

      A legendary South Indian breakfast dish, the mix veg upma is the best way to start your day with a nutritious boost. The mix veg upma recipe comes power-packed and can be had with many condiments, including bananas, brown sugar, chutney, sambar and tomato chutney. The process to make mixed veg upma is super simple, and there are a few simple ingredients. If you want to know how to make mix veg up ... ma, we’ve got it for you. All you need is rava or semolina for the base and the other vegetables can be added as per your discretion. The mix veg upma calories are also less, which means you can have it multiple times a week. The word upma itself derives from the word for “salt.” It has a salty texture but can be had as both breakfast and dinner. To prepare mix veg upma at home, you require spices, lentils, ghee and a bit of boiled water. The water helps the upma absorb and become fluffy in nature. Then, you can add vegetables such as carrots, tomatoes, chillies, beans and peas. A nice way to enjoy more from the mix veg upma benefits is to add cashews or peanuts to give it that crunchy, delicious finish. One portion of upma can serve up to four people and you can also store it in the fridge and reheat it for later consumption. It is a popular breakfast and lunch item that you can give your kids too,

      Nutrition Info. (per serving)

      ProteinFatCarbsFibre434 Cal434 Cal434 Cal434 Cal
      • 12gProtein
      • 16gFat
      • 63gCarbs
      • 5gFibre

      Ingredients

      Dry Grocery

      Coconut Oil

      Coconut Oil

      2 teaspoons

      Mustard Seeds

      Mustard Seeds

      1 pinch

      Asafoetida/hing

      Asafoetida/hing

      1 pinch

      Chana Dal

      Chana Dal

      2 teaspoons

      Urad Dal Whole White Gota

      Urad Dal Whole White Gota

      1.5 teaspoons

      Salt

      Salt

      1 teaspoon

      Rava Sooji

      Rava Sooji

      0.5 cups

      Fruits & Vegetables

      Curry Leaves

      Curry Leaves

      8 leafs

      Coconut (big)

      Coconut (big)

      0.5 cups

      Haricot Bean

      Haricot Bean

      8 units

      Carrot-regular

      Carrot-regular

      0.5 unit

      Other

      Cow Milk

      Cow Milk

      0.25 cups

      Water

      Water

      0.5 glasss

      Directions
      1
      Heat Oil in a pan, add Mustard Seeds, Hing, Urad Dal and Chana Dal. Saute till golden brown. Add Curry Leaves and saute further. Keep aside.
      2
      In a Blender, Blend Coconut. Mix with the tempering and Water. Pour to a small container. Adjust seasoning. Keep the chutney aside.
      3
      Boil Carrot and Beans with salt. Keep aside.
      4
      Heat Oil in a pan, add Mustard Seeds, Curry Leaves, Chana Dal and Urad Dal. Sauté till Golden Brown.
      5
      Add boiled Vegetables and sauté for sometime.
      6
      Add Rava Sooji and sauté for sometime.
      7
      Add salt, then Milk and Water. Cook it till all the Water evaporates and Upma becomes nice and fluffy. Serve hot with coconut chutney.

      Success!

      We hope you had fun making it! Enjoy the meal.

      Lock Your Doors and Hide Your Pohas – There’s a New Sheriff in Town

      The existence of Upma or Uppittu is as old as history or so as we know it. But even just the name of this mouthwatering wheat concoction continues to bring joy to the tummies of South Indian kids everywhere and to strike fear into the hearts of spice-seeking tourists. The history of this signature creation is as rich as the country it is housed in, having gloriously fed all walks of life without distinction or disparity. Even its eternal rivals from the North in the form of kanda poha and masala oats could not hold a torch to the absolute brilliance and glory that is upma. It is in this kind of ruthless dedication that we derive the true soul of our food. It is oftentimes less about the contents of the plate and more about the passion and peace of the palette that defines the true greatness of a dish. No rava is too great and no adrak is too kadva; we will leave no chaval unchurned until mummy ka suji ka upma gets all the attention it deserves! The more you know: the name of this dish in Malayalam – “uppumavu” – literally translates to “salt mango tree”. There is absolutely no context as to how or why. It just is.

      The Legend of Widows

      Uppittu as we know it sees its humble beginnings in the most eccentric of circumstances – it was originally conceived as a dish aimed at widows. Indeed, widows bore the worst plights in the name of purity and honour; and according to popular legends and wives’ tales, widows of the past were prohibited from eating salt and various spices. In fact, they were banned from consuming anything even vaguely resembling a full course meal of rice for dinner. So instead, they’d simply leave some rice in water, let it soak through, dry it out and turn it into granulated wheat called semolina – colloquially rava (ruh-waa) or suji (soo-jee). They would then proceed to steam it and eat it as required, cleverly adhering to all the conditions of the prohibition while still consuming a belly full of rice. Eventually, as a greater number of middle-class wage earners began working as clerks and agents, the upma that we’ve grown to know and love today had slowly begun to take shape. This dish was quickly being established as a sort of quick bite to nibble on alongside their coffee in the evening for when they would return home from an exhausting day of work or as a light dinner option for later in the night. This was also around the time when the once bland semolina was tweaked and nutritiously engorged with various other ingredients like curry leaves, lentils, ginger, chillies and more in order to slowly turn it into the modern rendition of an age-old delicacy.

      If “Ifs” and “Buts” Were Suji and Nuts

      Ever since its mainstream popularity, there have been vocally persistent and verbally violent debates between upma enthusiasts worldwide regarding exactly how to make upma. But of course, upma recipes have changed over the years! They have travelled far and wide, all across the Indian subcontinent from Kerala to Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Katakana, Maharashtra, Odia, Sri Lanka – and those are just the big names. What was once conceived as a simple and indulgent breakfast dish was quickly turning into a generous helping of culinary chauvinism. A literal, and we mean literal, nationwide controversy was set ablaze over discussion on the right way to cook upama – arguments for and against, panel discussions, divided chefs, blindsides nutritionists, gripping TV reports, dramatic music, intense camera angles, the whole shebang. The consensus? Nothing. Absolutely nothing. Even after hoarding the ears of adults and children alike, the whole nation could not, and still cannot, come to an agreement about the perfect upma recipe. It has proved impossible for the culturally rich and delicate subcontinent of India to call upon their many culturally rich and delicate heads to arrive on a simple set of ingredients for an integral national delicacy. If only we had more adjectives to really cement the utter childishness of this. So to bury the hatchet vegetable upma recipes once and for all from our end – hot take or not – if “ifs'' and “buts'' really were suji and nuts, we’d all have a merry Ugadi. But there is still no right way to cook upama! (unless of course, you’re talking about uppumavu because we all know that’s one of a kind, shh.)

      The Many Faces of a Culinary Masterpiece

      The great thing about upma ingredients is that you could combine them in any particular order and you would still end up with a finger-licking outcome. Unlike your everyday sandwich and scrambled eggs, upma recipes rely less on complexity and more on final production quality to deliver the most culinary fineness south of the border. Take for instance rava upma – there is rarely any sort of debate on what serves best as a complement to a great rava upma recipe because there is nothing better than a perfect, warm helping upma rava! Culinary masterpieces do not need side pieces; they are perfect just the way they are. And this can be extrapolated to all forms of uppumavu, whether it be masala, Rava, or suji upma. That being said, nothing ever beats a true classic. In closing, we would like to add that in a world being overrun with sushi, steaks, omelette and mud cakes, nothing trumps the vintage take on a beautiful upma. Long gone are the futile Google searches for “quick dinner recipes” and on a steady rise are the hits for “how to make suji upma” in the internet histories of bachelors and apologetic husbands alike. And if you’ve made it this far, we’re sure you’ll happily agree.

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